Sunday, 17 February 2013

Happy New Year from Paris - Pantheon, Sorbonne, Boulevard Saint-Michel and Notre Dame de Paris

Pantheon
Saint Etienne
Pantheon was built between 1764 and 1790 to replace the illustrious 11th century Church of Sainte Genevieve Abbey.  Sainte Genevieve Abbey was founded in 507 by King Clovis, the first french christian King, to house his tomb. Sainte Genevieve, the patron saint of Paris, was buried there in 512. During the 1789 revolution, the Abbey was closed down, the relics desecrated. The relics of Sainte Genevieve are now housed in close by Saint Etienne du Mont Church.


Le Pantheon now functions as a secular mausoleum and houses among others the remains of Pierre and Marie Curie, the physicists who discovered radioactivity, Voltaire, Rousseau and Victor Hugo, three famous French writers and philosophers. It is in Le Pantheon that French Physicist Leon Foucault made his famous pendulum experiment in 1851, demonstrating the rotation of the earth.







Sorbonne University
Sorbonne University
Paris Sorbonne University is the main inheritor of the old Sorbonne, which dates back to the 13th century. It was one of the first universities in the world. The biggest complex in France, dedicated to Literature, Languages, Civilizations, Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, is located on the original medieval foundations, and now extends to the Latin Quarter and to other areas in Paris. The University has two characteristics : rich culture and tradition, with top-quality researchers, and therefore an excellent scientific reputation shown through publications and international exchanges; its concern to constantly adapt to present day social and technological changes and to encourage as many students as possible to study at Paris-Sorbonne while preparing for their future careers.


Sorbonne University
The Sorbonne incites its students to think freely, to construct their own judgment, so that they can become responsible and inventive citizens who can promote dignity and peace culture. http://www.english.paris-sorbonne.fr/research/






Mico cat
This official site of the Sorbonne University briefly speaks about this famous institutions, I have nothing to add except that I, at this point, felt wonderful as part of a large smart family. There I met a cat Mico, who wasn't really in the mood for cuddling but I had a little chat with him.
 
Boulevard Saint-Michel

Boulevard Saint-Michel
The Boulevard Saint-Michel is one of the two major streets in the Latin Quarter of Paris the other being the Boulevard Saint Germain. It is a tree-lined boulevard which runs south from the pont Saint-Michel on the Seine river and the Place Saint Michel, crosses the boulevard Saint Germain and continues alongside the Sorbonne and the Luxembourg gardens, ending at the Place Camille Jullian just before the Port Royal railway station and the avenue de l'Observatoire. It was created by Baron Haussmann to run parallel to the rue Saint  Jacques which marks the historical north-south axis of Paris. It is really unique pleasure to walk this great spacious boulevard.


Notre Dame

Notre Dame
The Notre Dame is not the largest cathedral in the world, but surly is the most famous of all cathedrals in the world. The gothic masterpiece is located on the Ile de la Cite, a small island in the heart of the city. The site of the Notre Dame is the cradle of Paris and has always been the religious center of the city. The Celts had their sacred ground here, the Romans built a temple to worship Jupiter. A Christian basilica was built in the 6th century and the last religious structure before the Notre Dame construction started was a Romanesque church.
Notre Dame
Bishop Maurice de Sully started the construction in 1163. The Cathedral was to be built in the new gothic style and had to reflect Paris's status as the capital of the Kingdom France. During the Revolution, many of the cathedral's sculptures, gargoyles and interior was removed or demolished. Restoration of the Cathedral started in 19th thanks in part to the writer Victor Hugo who made the Parisians realize that cathedral was worth restoring who with his book 'Notre Dame de Paris'. The 20 year long restoration was led by a local architect, Eugène Emmanuel Viollet-le-Duc. Viollet-le-Duc made drastic, controversial modifications to the building and even added a spire. The cathedral was restored again between 1991 and 2001, this time the historic architecture was carefully preserved.

Photos by: ilovetravels

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