Saturday, 11 June 2011

Berlin Charlotenburg


Charlotenburg is one of those beautiful castles scattered across Europe that kinda resemble each other. Whether you're approaching the castle, or just watching it on the picture, you get the "hmm, feels like Deja Vu" impression.

While that might be the case when it comes down to the looks, each of these castles has its own story to tell, so does Charlotenburg. It is not the must see attraction, but if you have enough available time to visit it or you're just into the castles, definitely do it. Enjoy the history, the beautiful view and the stroll down the park :).
Charlotenburg was Built by Elector Friederich III in 1699 as a summer palace for his wife Sophie Charlotte. The largest palace in Berlin is surrounded with a garden in baroque style. Inside, a collection of 18th century French paintings is the largest of its kind outside France. Visitors can see the Old Palace, with its baroque rooms, royal apartments, Chinese and Japanese porcelain collections and silverware chambers, as well as the New Wing, with its rococo splendor and fine furniture, added by Friederich the Great. Taking pictures is not allowed.

The complex was enlarged several times, adding a domed tower crowned with a statue of the goddess of happiness Fortuna, several wings, the Orangeries, the annex, and the Belvedere Teahouse, now a porcelain museum. Also worth noting is the mausoleum of Queen Louise, and the Schinkel pavilion, built as a summerhouse for King Friedrich Wilhelm II.

The palace was severely damaged in World War II, and rebuilt starting in the 1950’s.  Palace is now  home to the Museum for Pre and Early History, which boasts items from the famous Troy excavations carried out by Heinrich Schliemann in the 1800’s. Tickets for each section are sold separately; gardens are open to the public for no charge. Restaurant has a sunny atrium and outdoor seating for pleasant weather, and provides a nice place to dine, enjoy tea, coffe or  ice cream. Its larger   building, the Grosse Orangerie, hosts classical music concerts from April to October.

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